Updating our Wildlife Management Plan

Consultation has concluded

Pelicans float on lake.

Due to our ever-changing community, the Envision Longmont Multimodal & Comprehensive Plan and the City’s Sustainability Plan, the Wildlife Management Plan is due for an update. The plan was originally adopted in 2006.

The City has hired topic expert professionals to lead us through a public process and a plan update, coming in 2019.

Due to our ever-changing community, the Envision Longmont Multimodal & Comprehensive Plan and the City’s Sustainability Plan, the Wildlife Management Plan is due for an update. The plan was originally adopted in 2006.

The City has hired topic expert professionals to lead us through a public process and a plan update, coming in 2019.

Let us know what it is about wildlife in Longmont that enriches your life. Tell us what you value about coexisting with wildlife in Longmont. Feel free to share your words, photos and videos. We look forward to hearing about your personal experiences with wildlife in Longmont!

Thank you for sharing your personal experiences with wildlife in Longmont.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • Native Aquatic Species

    by ironekilz, 4 months ago

    St. Vrain Creek is a transitional stream dominated by gravel substrate and intermediate temperatures. This makes it a hotbed for fish diversity. As stated by Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) native aquatic species biologist Boyd Wright, the St. Vrain is a priority for CPW because many fish species still exist in the St. Vrain while they’ve been extirpated in most other parts of the state.

    Trees (both living and dead) are not only important to mammals and birds, but also to fish and other aquatic species. Tree canopy will help keep the river temperature down and downed trees will provide... Continue reading

  • Riparian Conservation Buffer and Open Space Acquisition

    by ironekilz, 4 months ago

    According to the Environmentally Responsible Planning section on the RSVP section of the city’s website, one of the goals of the RSVP is to “complete the project work in an environmentally sensitive manner.” One of the ways the city will achieve this goal is by planting “native-species trees, shrubs, and grasses” so as “to maintain and enhance natural wildlife habitat areas along the creek.”

    Eleven tree species have been highlighted for planting as part of the RSVP project with 6 of these species being riparian species native to Colorado. Visualizations of the river corridor following completion of the RSVP show... Continue reading

  • Diversity of Wildlife

    by ironekilz, 4 months ago

    I have been doing wildlife (primarily bird) surveys at the Peschel open space property near Sandstone Ranch since early 2016. These surveys were a condition of a grant used to partially fund river and greenway restoration work in that area. There are no pre-flood data of species presence or densities along the river corridor to compare with data collected post-flood because no comprehensive wildlife or vegetation surveys were done anywhere within Longmont prior to September 2013.

    Although it is impossible to chart how the flora and fauna have changed—for better or worse—as a result of the devastating 2013 flood, my... Continue reading